close
odif-quilting-spray
Odif quilting sprayOut of all the steps it takes to make a quilt, basting is the only step I dislike. As a matter of fact, I would try anything to make it easier. When I saw quilt basting spray by Odif, I couldn’t wait to try it.

The directions on the can tell you to apply a light coat of the spray to the back of your quilt top and then lay the top over the batting. Sounds easy, right?

I opened the sliding glass door for good ventilation and spread newspapers on the floor to protect from over-spray. And just in case there was some hidden problem, I decided to start with the quilt backing rather than the top.

I sprayed it on the wrong side of the backing and folded it in half, right sides together, to carry it upstairs where the batting was spread flat.

Odif quilting spray 2

All Stuck Up

I began to smooth the backing in place onto the batting. But somehow I managed to get the backing stuck to itself, to me, to the batting, and to everything else in my immediate vicinity. I felt like a cartoon character stuck on fly paper.

The spray sticks really well but, lucky for me, it lifts to be re-positioned without losing the holding power.

Like anything else, the first time you try to do something, it’s awkward. You’ll be pleased to know that it gets easier the more you do it.

My subsequent pieces were much easier to handle. The ease in handling resulted not just from my increase in dexterity, but also from my realizing that I should be using a lighter coat of quilting spray. The fabric does not need to be wet for this product to be effective. The lightest coat holds very well.

A Little Dab’ll Do You

A light coat also reduces the chance of sticky needles. I can see how sewing machine needles could get gummed up if the fabric was sprayed too heavily.

You need only the lightest mist to get really good hold. I tried to see how little I could use before quit holding. I never found this out because any amount I used held in my test.

My test consisted of hand quilting and machine quilting. I tried hand quilting to see if the spray made the fabric stiff and hard to quilt.

I chose to quilt the alphabet on a Tumbling Block wall hanging because it was a project I could finish relatively quickly, an important consideration since the adhesive qualities disappear completely after several weeks. The change in feel of the fabric was less than that of spray sizing and didn’t pose any noticeable increase in difficulty with hand quilting.

Look Ma, No Stitches!

Next, I decided to machine quilt using a walking foot, which requires that I lift the presser foot with the needle still in the fabric and swinging the quilt into a new position to begin quilting again. Wrestling the fabric around would test the holding power of the quilting spray was more than using the darning foot.

When I was done quilting, I removed all the stitches to check the holding power of the spray. Everything held without any pulling away or puckering.

Use It Or Lose It

The disappearance of the adhesive is both a blessing and a consideration. Remember not to use this product on anything you can’t finish relatively quickly, like a large hand-quilting project.

The 13-ounce can goes a long way. Even after all my little tests, there is plenty in the can to do many more projects. I’m looking forward to using it all, while keeping the following hints in mind:

  • don’t use on very fine synthetic fabrics
  • make sure your fabric is color safe before spraying
  • use only on items you can finish relatively quickly
  • spray with good ventilation
  • spray lightly

If you dislike basting as much as I do then run, don’t walk, to get your Odif quilt basting spray. It is much easier and faster to use than a basting gun and the results are great.

=> Click here for more information about the Odif quilt basting spray.

Tags : basting gunquilt spray

1 Comment

Leave a Response